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About SCI Living with SCI SCI and Fertility Procedures for Men

 

 

 

 

- Spinal Cord Injuries - SCI -

Each year, over 10,000 people suffer from spinal cord injuries in the United States, predominately men between 16 and 30 years of age.   These men face a number of challenges in their daily lives, from reduced mobility to impaired sexual function, and the question “Will I be able to father a child?” can add stress to an already difficult emotional and physical situation. 

Although the majority of men with spinal cord injuries are able to have erections sufficient for intercourse, about 90% are unable to ejaculate and require medical assistance to produce semen.   Of those couples in which the man can ejaculate during intercourse, only a few successfully conceive a child.  This is because the motility of sperm, as well as the number of living sperm, is very low in the semen of men with spinal cord injuries. 

Fortunately, procedures are available to help relieve the stress of infertility for men with spinal cord injuries.   At the Institute for Reproductive Medicine and Genetic Testing, we believe  that there is no reason why these men should not be able to become caring and loving parents.

In Vitro Fertilization


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Last modified: 04/02/04